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Welcome to the Grand Traverse Humanists. If you value science, reason, and compassion and believe that humans are responsible for their own destiny, you have come to the right place. We are a community for the non-religious in the Grand Traverse area, offering a forum for discussing and advancing a secular worldview based on our common humanity. Our programs include monthly speakers and discussions, film and book groups, and various volunteer and social events. All are free and open to the public. Check out Upcoming Events below, or click on the calendar. Nontheists, agnostics, atheists, freethinkers, rationalists, humanists, and more…we welcome you to join us!

Grand Traverse Humanists Main Meeting

Second Monday of each month, 7 p.m.

Traverse Area District Library main branch, 610 Woodmere Ave., TC

What’s New

  • Enlightenment Now by Steven Pinker

    Enlightenment Now cover
    Discussion to be held September 30 at Gregg and Sue’s house.
    Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: In seventy-five jaw-dropping graphs, Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West, but worldwide. This progress is not the result of some cosmic force. It is a gift of the Enlightenment: the conviction that reason and science can enhance human flourishing. Far from being a naïve hope, the Enlightenment, we now know, has worked. But more than ever, it needs a vigorous defense. The Enlightenment project swims against currents of human nature–tribalism, authoritarianism, demonization, magical thinking–which demagogues are all too willing to exploit. Many commentators, committed to political, religious, or romantic ideologies, fight a rearguard action against it. The result is a corrosive fatalism and a willingness to wreck the precious institutions of liberal democracy and global cooperation.With intellectual depth and literary flair, Enlightenment Now makes the case for reason, science, and humanism: the ideals we need to confront our problems and continue our progress.

    Reviews:

    Given the 24-hour news cycle to which we have grown accustomed, it’s difficult to navigate life and think that everything is peachy. But Steven Pinker has set out, first in The Better Angels of Our Nature, and now in Enlightenment Now, to illustrate that there has never been a better time to be a human being. In his new book, Pinker points out that the slow creep of progress is not as newsworthy as, say, an earthquake or an explosion. So it’s clear why we don’t always have the sense that things are getting better. But the Enlightenment—with its dedication to science, reason, humanism, and progress—has led people to live longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives. And Pinker uses charts, data, history, and a firm dedication to his cause to empirically prove that we are living in better times. It makes sense to be skeptical of a scientist arguing that that science is the answer. And his optimism won’t always jibe with your personal experience or judgement. But there’s lots to chew on here—and it’s so easy to obsess on the intrusions and negatives of technology and “advancement” that this book can serve as a kind of antidote. Chris Schluep, the Amazon Book Review

    One of The Guardian’s “Books to Buy in 2018”

    “The world is getting better, even if it doesn’t always feel that way. I’m glad we have brilliant thinkers like Steven Pinker to help us see the big picture. Enlightenment Now is not only the best book Pinker’s ever written. It’s my new favorite book of all time.”—Bill Gates

    “A terrific book…[Pinker] recounts the progress across a broad array of metrics, from health to wars, the environment to happiness, equal rights to quality of life.”—Nicholas Kristof, The New York Times

    “Steven Pinker’s mind bristles with pure, crystalline intelligence, deep knowledge and human sympathy.”—Richard Dawkins

    “Pinker is a paragon of exactly the kind of intellectual honesty and courage we need to restore conversation and community.”—David Brooks, The New York Times

    “[Enlightenment Now] is magnificent, uplifting and makes you want to rush to your laptop and close your Twitter account.”The Economist

    “[A] magisterial new book…Enlightenment Now is the most uplifting work of science I’ve ever read.”Science Magazine

    “A passionate and persuasive defense of reason and science…[and] an urgently needed reminder that progress is, to no small extent, a result of values that have served us – and can serve us – extraordinarily well.”The Philadelphia Inquirer

    “A meticulous defense of science and objective analysis, [and] a rebuttal to the tribalism, knee-jerk partisanship and disinformation that taints our politics.”San Francisco Chronicle

    “Brimming with surprising data and entertaining anecdotes.”Financial Times

    “[Pinker] makes a powerful case that the main line of history has been, since the Enlightenment, one of improvement.”—Scientific American

    “Let’s stop once in a while to enjoy the view—I’m glad Pinker is pushing for this in a world that does it too rarely… It’s hard not to be convinced.”—Quartz

    Enlightenment Now is formidable.”Financial Times

    “As a demonstration of the value of reason, knowledge, and curiosity, Enlightenment Now can hardly be bettered.”The Boston Globe

    “With a wealth of knowledge, graphs and statistics, a strong grasp of history, and an engaging style of writing…Enlightenment Now provides a convincing case for gratitude.”Pittsburgh Post Gazette

    “A masterly defense of the values of modernity against ‘progressophobes’.”Times Higher Education

    “Enlightenment Now strikes a powerful blow against the contemporary mystifications being peddled by tribalists on both the left and the right.”—Reason
    “Pinker presents graphs and data which deserve to be reckoned with by fair-minded people. His conclusion is provocative, as anything by Pinker is likely to be.” Colorado Springs Gazette

    “Elegantly [argues] that in various ways humanity has every reason to be optimistic over life in the twenty-first century…. A defense of progress that will provoke deep thinking and thoughtful discourse among his many fans.”Booklist

    “Pinker defends progressive ideals against contemporary critics, pundits, cantankerous philosophers, and populist politicians to demonstrate how far humanity has come since the Enlightenment…In an era of increasingly “dystopian rhetoric,” Pinker’s sober, lucid, and meticulously researched vision of human progress is heartening and important.”Publishers Weekly

    “[An] impeccably written text full of interesting tidbits from neuroscience and other disciplines…The author examines the many ways in which Enlightenment ideals have given us lives that our forebears would envy even if gloominess and pessimism are the order of the day.” —Kirkus Review

    Author Biography:

    Steven Pinker is one of the world’s leading authorities on language and the mind. His popular and highly praised books include The Stuff of Thought, The Blank Slate, Words and Rules, How the Mind Works, and The Language Instinct. The recipient of several major awards for his teaching, books, and scientific research, Pinker is Harvard College Professor and Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He also writes frequently for The New York Times, Time, The New Republic, and other magazines.


  • Hungry Humanists: Hopscotch Brick Oven and Taproom

    Eat Drink and be MerryMonday, June 25

    Hungry Humanists: Hopscotch Brick Oven and Taproom

    7 p.m…2032 E. 31 North, Traverse City

    Hungry Humanists will meet to eat at the new brick oven restaurant Hopscotch (so named because they’re known for their craft beer and scotch). The restaurant is located just east of Four Mile Road off the TART Trail (bike caravans to dinner encouraged!).
    RSVP to Marlene at marlene.smith8@gmail.com


  • Grand Traverse Humanists Bike Ride

    Leelanau Trail
    Sunday, July 1 2018
    Grand Traverse Humanists Bike Ride
    10:30 a.m., Darrow Park, Traverse City to Suttons Bay

    All summer long, Grand Traverse Humanists host bike rides on the first Sunday of the month. Usually we start at Darrow Park in Traverse City at 10:30 a.m., bike up to Suttons Bay on the Leelanau Trail, have lunch, and then bike back (or take BATA back to Traverse City). However, we’ve also biked other local trails, including the Heritage Trail in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and the Betsie Valley Trail from Beulah to Frankfort. This month we’ll bike from Darrow Park to Suttons Bay and back, but adventures further afield are possible for future outings… stay tuned!


  • Book Discussion: The Swerve

    The Swerve book cover
    Sunday, June 10 2018*date change*
    Book Discussion: The Swerve

    4 p.m., Scott and Suzette’s home

    We’ll meet to discuss the book The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt.

    More information on the book available here: http://www.gthumanists.org/book-club


  • Meeting at the Library: Autism

    Autism graphic
    Monday, June 11 2018

    Meeting at the Library: Autism
    7 p.m….610 Woodmere Ave., Traverse City

    Join us as we welcome Carol Danly, co-founder of Northwest Michigan NT (Neurotypical) Support, a group that provides hope and support to those experiencing the challenges of relating to an adult with Asperger’s Syndrome or autism by creating opportunities to safely share, learn, connect and grow. Danly will speak about her personal experience of having a husband with autism. Author Cari Noga, whose book Sparrow Migrations features an autistic protagonist, will start off the evening with a reading.