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Welcome to the Grand Traverse Humanists. If you value science, reason, and compassion and believe that humans are responsible for their own destiny, you have come to the right place. We are a community for the non-religious in the Grand Traverse area, offering a forum for discussing and advancing a secular worldview based on our common humanity. Our programs include monthly speakers and discussions, film and book groups, and various volunteer and social events. All are free and open to the public. Check out Upcoming Events below, or click on the calendar. Nontheists, agnostics, atheists, freethinkers, rationalists, humanists, and more…we welcome you to join us!

Grand Traverse Humanists Main Meeting

Second Monday of each month, 7 p.m.

Traverse Area District Library main branch, 610 Woodmere Ave., TC

Upcoming Events

  • TART Trails and Michigan Land Use Institute: “Walk this Way”

    Monday, April 14 2014

    TART Trails and Michigan Land Use Institute: “Walk this Way”

    7 p.m….History Center of Traverse City, 322 Sixth St., Traverse City…will include an actual walk outside, so dress accordingly!

    Join James Bruckbauer, Transportation Policy Specialist with MLUI and Julie Clark, Executive Director of TART Trails on a walk around the block to explore what’s happening in the world of active transportation in the Grand Traverse region. Learn more about trends in commuter behaviors, new projects and partnerships, and how connections between non-motorized transportation, transit and local employers are working together to help strengthen communities.

  • Book Discussion: The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt

    The Righteous Mind book coverSunday, April 6 2014

    Book Discussion…The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, by Jonathan Haidt

    4 p.m….3773 Vale Dr., East Bay Township/Traverse City (Holiday Village)

  • Meeting at the History Center: Mella McCormick and Chris Kuchuris: Evolution of Morality

    Evolution graphicMonday, March 10 2014

    Mella McCormick and Chris Kuchuris: Evolution of Morality

    7 p.m….History Center of Traverse City, 322 Sixth St., Traverse City

    Pulling the plug on a brain-dead person on life-support, altering the genetic make-up of an embryo, using sophisticated software to surreptitiously collect information on citizens, deploying ‘assassin drones’ in a far off country: these are but a few of the moral dilemmas facing modern man. When confronted with difficult situations we often wonder; what is the right thing do? To answer this age-old question humans have turned to many sources from appeasing the gods, to following the 10 Commandments, to satisfying our Pleasure Principle, to seeking the greatest good for the greatest number.

    Yet all of these sources of so-called wisdom are inadequate as guides for moral action for they provide no way of assessing particular situations and all moral choices are done in the particular, not the general. Appease the gods says Homer: which ones? Thou shalt not murder commands Moses: okay, but when does the taking of life rise to the level of murder? Satisfy your pleasure-principle urges Freud: but what about the unintended consequences? Do the greatest good for the greatest number counsels Bentham: but who determines the greatest good?

    Our advances in technology create complex moral dilemmas that Modern man may be ill-equipped to manage but they do not change the fact that the fount of morality lies within each of us not as fated by the gods, or in the avoidance of hell, or in following an instinctual drive, or in seeking the greatest good. Morality is a function of thinking for as the saying goes; “The quality on our living is determined by the quality of our decisions, and the quality of our decisions is determined by the quality of our thinking.”

    As such, any circumstance we encounter does not come pre-labeled as morally loaded; all circumstances must be interpreted individually as we encounter them so we need to ask, what part of us does this interpreting, for the accuracy of our interpretations determines how well we can make choices to manage any moral conundrum we may encounter.

    In our presentation we will challenge some of our most basic assumptions regarding the traditional, as well as contemporary sources of our ethical decisions and we will provide a workable alternative in showing how our ability to reason is all we need in setting the frame of reference for our moral compass.

    Mella McCormick is a philosophy professor at Northwestern Michigan College.  She completed her undergraduate studies at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana and Keele University in Staffordshire, England.  She attended the University of Missouri-Columbia for her graduate work in philosophy. Prior to teaching in Michigan, Mella taught both philosophy and women’s studies at the College of Southern Nevada in Las Vegas where she authored and chaired the Associate of Arts degree in Women’s Studies. Her most recent publication is The Danger of Relativism in Reason in The International Journal of Arts & Sciences, Fall 2013 which she co-authored with Chris Kuchuris.

    Chris Kuchuris earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Philosophy from DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. He also attended graduate school there and at the University of Nevada, where he obtained a Master’s Degree in Ethics and Policy Studies. He has been working in philosophy for the past 22 years teaching classes in Ethics, Critical Thinking, and Existentialism at the College of Southern Nevada. Chris has published a textbook titled Puncturing Our Illusions: Developing Our Critical Thinking Attitude.  His most recent publication is The Danger of Relativism in Reason in The International Journal of Arts & Sciences, Fall 2013 which he co-authored with Mella McCormick.

  • Media Night

    Movie Night imageMonday, March 24 2014

    Media Night

    7 p.m…517 Birchwood Ave., Traverse City

    Join us for a movie, snacks, and conversation from a Humanist point of view in a casual atmosphere.

  • Meeting at the History Center: Jeremy Beahan “Does Religion Make People Better?”

    Jeremy BeahanMonday, February 10 2014

    Jeremy Beahan of Center for Inquiry Michigan: “Does Religion Make People Better?”

    7 p.m….History Center of Traverse City, 322 Sixth St., Traverse City

    Does religion make us happier, healthier and more helpful? A number of popular psychology books and articles argue that religion is a positive force for enhancing the health and well-being of both individuals and whole communities. A careful examination of the social psychological literature, however, reveals a complicated relationship between religion and “pro-social” traits that defies such a simple characterization. Luke Galen, Professor of Psychology at Grand Valley State University, recently reviewed dozens of studies on religion and pro-social traits for the American Psychological Association’s Psychology Bulletin, exposing some of the misleading ways in which this research is conducted and presented to the public. For this talk Jeremy Beahan (instructor of Philosophy and World Religions at Kendall College of Art and Design and co-host of the popular Reasonable Doubts Podcast) will summarize key details of the review in a way that is accessible to non-professionals and reveal the devil lurking in the details.

  • Chef Eric Patterson: The Art and Soul of Sustainable, Local Cuisine

    Monday, January 13 2014

    Chef Eric Patterson: The Art and Soul of Sustainable, Local Cuisine

    7 p.m….History Center of Traverse City, 322 Sixth St., Traverse City

    Eric Patterson is co-chef and co-owner of The Cooks’ House in Traverse City. Prior to The Cooks’ House, Eric was head chef under legendary chef André Rouchat at André’s in Las Vegas. Eric has authored one cookbook with co-chef Jennifer Blakeslee.